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Beechwood Homes

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Blog posts tagged in Development Applications

One of the most asked about topics that often comes up when starting the planning process with Beechwood Homes’ is “What is the difference between a Development Application (DA) and a Complying Development Certificate (CDC)? 


It is important to note that before any work can commence on your new home, either a DA or CDC will need to be lodged and approved by your local council or a qualified certifier.

What are DAs and CDCs? And what is the difference between them?
A Development Application (otherwise known as a DA) is the application made to your local council seeking consent to carry out a development. A Complying Development Certificate (otherwise known as a CDC) is an alternative to a DA and can be known to some as a fast track approval process when dealing with a more straight-forward development.

The major difference between the two is that a CDC’s requirements for development approval are a more universal set of requirements and cannot be amended to suit the needs of your development. The requirements for a CDC are considered to be “black and white” and these requirements apply across the state of NSW. The requirements for a DA will vary between the local councils of NSW. Each local council have their own set of requirements specific to their regions, and whilst your local council may have similar requirements to that of a CDC, your local council are in a better position to assist you with a development approval for your project if your development needs are more complex.

How do I know which method is the most appropriate for my job?
Beechwood Homes have been building new homes, and facilitating knock-down rebuild projects for over 35 years. We have a knowledgeable team of drafts people who, when creating your initial tender, will review and assess the factors your site may contain and will recommend which method of development application is best suited for your new home.

When do I need to decide which path I will go down for my development application?
The decision for a development application will need to be finalised in the early stages of planning your development. Once you receive your plans and tender for review, the team at Beechwood Homes will then discuss with you our recommendations for your development application. Beechwood’s recommendation will be based on your job’s specific needs and requirements.

Is there anyone who can help me with my development application?
When you have opted to build a new home or conduct a knock-down rebuild with Beechwood Homes, the good news is we will guide you through the entire building process starting from the planning stage right through to construction and even maintenance stages, as seamless as possible. Our team have experienced, dedicated members who are happy to assist you in planning, and realising your dream home. We work in conjunction with your local council and reputable certifiers to ensure we stay up to date with all guidelines outlined for both DA and CDC applications.

If you find that you still have some questions regarding your development application, you can seek advice from your local council or an accredited certifier. The team at Beechwood Homes will be happy to go through any questions or concerns you may have and explain them further to you.

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So many people that are new to the property game – and let’s face it, we all were once – seem to come up against the same the question. “What is the difference between a solicitor and a conveyancer? Both can handle standard conveyancing, so which should I be using?” The answers are really quite simple but it is important to understand one key difference.

The key difference between a conveyancer and a solicitor is that a conveyancer focuses solely on the process of transferring property ownership between parties, and a solicitor is able to perform other services in addition to conveyancing as needed.

In order to understand this further, it is important to explore the term ‘real property’. Real property is simply immovable property, primarily land and buildings. Real property is the term applied to all land, buildings and their fixtures in relation to ownership. The reason it is important to understand this term is because a key definition between these two legal professions is that a conveyancer is restricted to dealing with real property while a solicitor is able to deal with more intangible matters, such as wills and bonds, as well as conveyancing.

Most property transactions will only require the services of a conveyancer as opposed to a solicitor. By focusing solely on property transfers and sales, licensed conveyancers are able to offer a more cost-effective and specialised service. While full-service solicitors will charge by the hour, a conveyancer will more often than not charge a flat fee for a standard matter and their specific knowledge can expedite the process significantly.

However, a knowledgeable solicitor will be crucial if your property transaction is more complicated or requires attendance at a court. It would be wise to consult with a conveyancer initially to determine whether it is necessary to use a solicitor in order to avoid additional costs.

So, if you’re looking at whether you will need a solicitor or a conveyancer to handle your property transaction, it is important to take your own personal circumstances into consideration. More often than not, a licensed conveyancer will be able to handle your matter or in the least direct you to a solicitor who can.

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